norberto llopis segarra

home

 

Original Dutch version underneath


Marnix Rummens analyses the work of Norberto Segarra


THE STUFF DREAMS ARE MADE OF


If I were to wish for anything, I should not wish for wealth and power, but for the passionate sense of the potential, for the eye which, ever young and ardent, sees the possible. Søren Kierkegaard


1.

Patterns. We are all on a never-ending search to understand the world around us. Patterns help us to relate things to each other, to transfer experiences from one situation to another and by doing so to make the most of our environment. lt's a question of economics. Once we know what works best, or what we think of something, we can keep using that in similar situations. We really love these habits and routines, and they very quickly become so obvious that they define our most ordinary affairs. But in a constantly changing world, we are continuously urged to take a different view of things. Then the reverse process begins, whereby we detach things from their connections and check out new possibilities as if we were experiencing a situation for the first time. Art has played a major role in this process. And it is this ephemeral process that the choreographer Norberto Segarra tries to render tangible.


2.

Full of apparently random movements and absurd actions, his performances initially seem a little strange and even hermetic. Nevertheless, they always start out from an immediately recognizable visual language. Chairs, pots, dice, a bread board, rope. Segarra takes banal reality as his starting point and uses primarily simple everyday objects and strikingly ordinary movements. yet these familiar things have a strange, even absurd effect, often because of the way they are presented. In Tendency, for example, Segarra runs in circles across the stage, each time holding a different object, which has nothing to do with the last. There is very little in the way of dancing, but rather a game is played with our patterns of expectation and our desire to understand. Since props and movement end up so deconstructed, deprived of any context or causal link, Segarra renders a second level of meaning tangible: that of the underlying structure or syntax. Just as, when looking at Magritte's pipe, you become conscious of different levels of interpretation, Segarra's actions render tangible the mental subterfuges and constructions that we often make unconsciously.


3.

Orientation clearly indicates this, in the action where Segarra arranges objects and copies of them on the floor. As in a film directing, he not only knows how to manipulate our capacity to associate two objects (for example, a key and a photocopy of a key), but also between two levels of reality, In Gravity these two levels even have a far-reaching effect on each other. Four performers literally remove all kinds of daily objects from their structure, by grabbing them from shelving racks and ritually dropping them until they break. Using language, however, we are presented with several levels on which to watch the performance. When a dancer drops a blue tray, a voice accompanying this action tells us that the dancer would rather have smashed a vase to pieces. During a risky arrangement where a dancer sticks her legs between two stage elements, a story is told of a possible accident in this situation. On stage the 'what is' and ‘what might have been' (things that normally cancel each other out) are inextricably interwoven. As a result you start to interpret something as simple as a broken object in several different ways. Destruction becomes something constructive, because it is precisely in that obsessive smashing to pieces that a powerful idea is sown, in a strange sort of way the havoc becomes a monument, or a sensory game of sound and image.


4.

Segarra's pieces immerse you in a world from before things have been given their substance or form, both physically and mentally. Materia Potency, Ghosts elaborates this concept in even more extreme terms. The dancers get to work - in a completely arbitrary fashion - with only a few clear-cut rules to ensure that what is demonstrated can't possibly hold water. Instead of a clear tension builder, you see four performers chaotically jumping, running, stopping and crashing, then creeping, sitting and looking around extremely slowly. After a while, the viewer no longer knows what to expect, and more importantly what not to expect. Because your expectations about a dance performance have been so seriously undermined, you get the feeling that absolutely anything is possible. It is a wonderful paradox. By disconnecting material from any context to an absurd extent, Segarra makes a powerful potential tangible. He draws a very special kind of expression out of our reality.


5.

This broadening of outlook is also the idea behind Segarra's current research process, Stuff. Whereas in Monsters he gathered together objects that were impossible to categorise at first glance, in Stuff his intention is to present recognizable, even banal objects in such a way that we feel as though this is the first time we have seen them. This time not by changing or smashing the objects, but by forming a relationship with them. Segarra uses a tight schedule to achieve this: one by one, objects are positioned on the stage, then approached by a performer who enters into a relationship with them. Here too, obvious causal narrative or symbolic connections are avoided, giving rise to events that again initially appear absurd. But those who stop looking for what they expect will find the meaning in what is left: the differences in nuance that evoke the changing relationships between object and user. Object and subject no longer form entirely distinct entities with separate characteristics, but instead redefine each other in changing relationships.


6.

In essence, Segarra’s performances are scripts or methods aimed to keep your mind open. They try not to look at the world definitively from just one perspective, but see the added value of continuously scanning between different outlooks. Segarra’s performances are interim stops that expose the driving force behind our mental categories, making them tangible, flexible and actable. Nor is the body presented as a defined and fixed fact. The contours are constantly redefined by the relationships it enters into. Whereas in Materia Potency, Ghosts the potential was largely contained in the material itself, the essence of the objects in Stuff is defined by our relationship with them. In that sense, Stuff jeopardises the traditional distinction between objectivity and subjectivity, between the inner and outer worlds: the way we look at the things and the impression they make on us, are inextricably linked. That's what makes Segarra's art so incredibly tangible. And that too is what he imparts to his audience: the unlimited scope between self and world, between mental and physical processes, between what is and what can be.




Marnix Rummens ontleedt het werk van Norberto Segarra



THE STUFF DREAMS ARE MADE OF

 


If I were to wish for anything, I should not wish for wealth and power, but for the passionate sense of the potential, for the eye which, ever young and ardent, sees the possible. Søren Kierkegaard


1.

Patronen. Onophoudelijk zijn we ernaar op zoek om de wereld rondom ons te begrijpen. Ze staan ons toe om zaken in verband te brengen, ervaringen over te dragen van de ene naar de andere situatie en dus optimaal in te spelen op onze omgeving. Het is een kwestie van economie. Eens we er uit zijn wat het beste werkt, of op welke manier we tegenover iets staan, kunnen we dat blijven toepassen in gelijkaardige situaties. We houden erg van die gewoontes en routines, en al snel gaan ze als evidenties ons meest dagelijkse doen en laten bepalen. Maar in een wereld die onophoudelijk verandert worden we ook voortdurend aangezet om zaken te herbekijken. Dan zet zich een omgekeerd proces in gang, waarin we de dingen losweken uit hun verbanden en nieuwe mogelijkheden aftasten alsof we voor het eerst in een situatie terechtkomen. In dat proces heeft kunst altijd een grote rol gespeeld. En het is dit efemere proces dat Norberto Segarra als choreograaf tastbaar probeert te maken.


2.

Vol schijnbaar willekeurige bewegingen en absurde acties doen zijn voorstellingen aanvankelijk wat bizar of zelfs hermetisch aan. Niettemin vertrekken ze steeds van een direct herkenbare beeldtaal. Stoelen, potjes, dobbelstenen, een broodplankje, touw. Segarra neemt de banale realiteit als uitgangspunt en hanteert voornamelijk eenvoudige gebruiksvoorwerpen en opvallend ordinair bewegingsmateriaal. En toch doen die vertrouwde zaken vreemd of zelfs absurd aan, vaak door de manier waarop ze worden gepresenteerd. In Tendency bijvoorbeeld loopt Segarra in cirkels over de scène, steeds met een ander voorwerp in de hand dat niks met het voorgaande te maken heeft. Er wordt nauwelijks gedanst maar een spel gespeeld met onze verwachtingspatronen en ons verlangen om te begrijpen. Omdat rekwisieten en beweging zo uitgepuurd op zich komen te staan, onttrokken aan elke context of causaal verband, maakt Segarra een tweede betekenisniveau tastbaar: dat van de achterliggende structuur of de syntaxis. Net zoals je je bij Magrittes pijp bewust wordt van verschillende interpretatieniveaus, maken de acties van Segarra de mentale kunstgrepen en constructies tastbaar die we vaak onbewust maken.


3.

Orientation geeft dat duidelijk aan in het spel waarbij Segarra op de grond constellaties maakt van objecten en kopieën van die objecten. Net zoals de montage van een film dat doet weet hij niet alleen ons associatievermogen tussen twee objecten te manipuleren, maar ook dat tussen twee werkelijkheidsniveaus. In Gravity gaan die twee niveaus elkaar zelfs verregaand beïnvloeden. Heel letterlijk halen vier performers allerlei gebruiksvoorwerpen uit hun structuur door ze uit een opstelling op rekken te halen en ritueel stuk te laten vallen. Talig worden er echter verschillende niveaus aangereikt om het getoonde te bekijken. Wanneer een danser een blauw dienblad laat vallen begeleidt een stem deze actie met de voetnoot dat de danser liever een vaas had stukgegooid. Tijdens een riskante opstelling waarbij een danseres haar benen tussen twee podiumelementen steekt wordt een verhaal verteld van een mogelijk ongeluk in die situatie. Op scène lopen wat is en wat had kunnen zijn (zaken die elkaar normaal uitsluiten) onlosmakelijk dooreen. En daardoor ga je zelfs iets eenduidigs als een stukgevallen object meerduidig interpreteren. Destructie krijgt iets constructiefs, omdat in dat obsessieve stukgooien net een krachtig idee wordt neergezet, de ravage op een vreemde manier ook een monument wordt, of een zintuiglijk spel van geluid en beeld.


4.

De stukken van Segarra dompelen je onder in een wereld nog vóór de dingen zijn ingevuld of uitgemaakt, zowel fysiek als mentaal. Materia Potency, Ghosts werkt die gedachte nog extremer uit. Met slechts enkele duidelijke regels die ervoor zorgen dat wat er getoond wordt absoluut geen steek kan houden gaan de dansers aan de slag – op basis van pure willekeur. In plaats van een bevattelijke spanningsboog zie je vier performers chaotisch springen, lopen, stoppen, botsen, vervolgens weer tergend traag sluipen, zitten en kijken. Als toeschouwer weet je na een tijd niet meer wat je kan verwachten, en vooral wat je niet meer kan verwachten. Doordat je verwachtingspatroon rond een dansvoorstelling zo wordt ondergraven krijg je het gevoel dat echt alles mogelijk wordt. Het is een wonderlijke paradox. Door materiaal tot op het absurde af los te koppelen van elke context maakt Segarra net een krachtig potentieel voelbaar. Uit reductie puurt hij een heel bijzonder soort expressie. En dan besef je dat die rijkdom niet alleen in het getoonde materiaal zit, maar ook in de onbevangen blik die de ervaring stimuleert. Je wordt je bewust van de mate waarin de verbanden of patronen waarmee we de dingen categoriseren onze werkelijkheid bepalen.


5.

Die blikverruiming vormt ook de inzet van Segarra's huidige onderzoeksproces, Stuff. Waar hij met Monsters nog objecten verzamelde die op het eerste gezicht niet te categoriseren vallen, wil hij in Stuff herkenbare, zelfs banale voorwerpen presenteren op een manier die de sensatie oproept dat we ze voor het eerst zien. Dit keer niet door de objecten te veranderen of stuk te gooien, maar door er een relatie mee aan te gaan. Daarvoor gebruikt Segarra een strak stramien: objecten worden beurtelings centraal op scène geplaatst, waarna een performer ze benadert en er een verhouding mee aangaat. Ook hier worden voor de hand liggende causale, narratieve of symbolische verbanden geweerd, waardoor het gebeuren aanvankelijk weer absurd overkomt. Maar wie opgeeft om te zoeken wat hij verwacht vindt net betekenis in wat overblijft: de nuanceverschillen die de wisselende relaties tussen voorwerp en gebruiker oproepen. Object en subject vormen niet langer strikt gescheiden entiteiten met afzonderlijke eigenschappen maar gaan elkaar in wisselende verhoudingen herbepalen.


6.

In essentie zijn de performances van Segarra scripts of methodieken om je blik open te houden. Ze proberen de wereld niet definitief in één perspectief onder te brengen, maar zien net de meerwaarde van het voortdurend blijven scannen tussen verschillende invalshoeken. Segarra’s performances zijn tussenzones die de sturende kracht van onze mentale categorieën blootleggen, ze tastbaar en flexibel maken. Ook het lichaam wordt niet opgevoerd als een omlijnd en vaststaand gegeven. De contouren ervan worden steeds herbepaald door de relaties die het aangaat. Waar het potentieel in Materia Potency, Ghosts nog grotendeels in het materiaal zelf zat, ligt de essentie van de objecten in Stuff besloten in onze houding ertegenover. In die zin zet Stuff de klassieke scheiding tussen objectiviteit en subjectiviteit op de helling: de manier waarop we de dingen bekijken en de manier waarop ze zich aan ons voordoen zijn onlosmakelijk met elkaar verbonden. En dat is wat de kunst van Segarra zo begeesterd tastbaar maakt, dat is wat hij aan zijn publiek meegeeft: de grenzeloze speelruimte tussen zelf en wereld, tussen mentale en fysieke processen, tussen wat is en wat kan zijn.